Running Android on a Windows Tablet



Android Emulator – AMD Processor & Hyper-V Support


Posted by Jamal Eason, Product Manager, AndroidSince the major revamp of the Android Emulator two years ago, we have focusedon delivering a fast and feature-rich emulator to help you build great appexperiences for users. Today, the Android Emulator is the top device deployedto from Android Studio — more than 2x over physical Android devices. We arehumbled to hear from many of you that the Android Emulator has come a longway, but we are not done yet.Making the Android Emulator faster is one of the top priorities for theAndroid Studio team. Over the last few releases, we have launched quick boot &emulator snapshots for quickly starting and resuming emulator sessions inunder 2 seconds. Up until now, our emulator experience has almost universallyworked on macOS® and Linux computers. But for users of Microsoft® Windows® orthe Microsoft® Hyper-V™ platform, our hardware accelerated speed enhancementsfor the Android Emulator only worked with computers with Intel® processors.Support for AMD® processors and Microsoft Hyper-V hypervisor are two long-standing user requests from the Android developer community that we are happyto address with this Android Emulator update.Today, you can download the latest Android Emulator release, which is enabledto run x86 based Android Virtual Devices (AVD) on computers that use AMDprocessors. This exciting update makes the Android Emulator more accessible toa new set of Android app developers that were previously limited to softwareemulation, but can now have hardware accelerated performance. Moreover, forthose of you who use Hyper-V to run your local app backend, the AndroidEmulator can now also coexist with other Hyper-V-backed applications onWindows® 10.Thanks to a new Microsoft Windows Hypervisor Platform (WHPX) API and recentopen-source contributions from Microsoft, even more Android app developers cantake advantage of all the speed improvements and features in the AndroidEmulator.Android Emulator running on Windows 10 with AMD Processor ScreenshotConfiguration: Asus ROG Strix GL 702ZC, Processor: AMD® Ryzen™ 7 1700Processor, Chipset: AMD 5350, Graphics: AMD® Radeon™ RX580Support for these technologies was initially available in the v27.3.8 AndroidEmulator canary release and today we are releasing this set of previewfeatures (AMD processor & Hyper-V support) on the stable channel for morefeedback. Alongside this update, we have added additional speed improvementsin loading emulator snapshots for those developers using the Intel® HardwareAccelerated Execution Manager (HAXM).

Next Steps & Feedback


Download the latest Android Emulator from the Android Studio 3.2 Beta SDKManager for the latest performance updates across all supported platforms thatyou are using. We are going to continue to invest in performance improvementsfor each of the platforms and we look forward to your feedback and featurerequests.If you find a bug or issue, feel free to file an issue. Connect with us — theAndroid Studio development team ‐ on our Google+ page or on Twitter.Android Emulator – AMD Processor & Hyper-V SupportPosted by Jamal Eason, Product Manager, AndroidSince the major revamp of the Android Emulator two years ago, we have focusedon delivering a fast and feature-rich emulator to help you build great appexperiences for users. Today, the Android Emulator is the top device deployedto from Android Studio — more than 2x over physical Android devices. We arehumbled to hear from many of you that the Android Emulator has come a longway, but we are not done yet.Making the Android Emulator faster is one of the top priorities for theAndroid Studio team. Over the last few releases, we have launched quick boot &emulator snapshots for quickly starting and resuming emulator sessions inunder 2 seconds. Up until now, our emulator experience has almost universallyworked on macOS® and Linux computers. But for users of Microsoft® Windows® orthe Microsoft® Hyper-V™ platform, our hardware accelerated speed enhancementsfor the Android Emulator only worked with computers with Intel® processors.Support for AMD® processors and Microsoft Hyper-V hypervisor are two long-standing user requests from the Android developer community that we are happyto address with this Android Emulator update.Today, you can download the latest Android Emulator release, which is enabledto run x86 based Android Virtual Devices (AVD) on computers that use AMDprocessors. This exciting update makes the Android Emulator more accessible toa new set of Android app developers that were previously limited to softwareemulation, but can now have hardware accelerated performance. Moreover, forthose of you who use Hyper-V to run your local app backend, the AndroidEmulator can now also coexist with other Hyper-V-backed applications onWindows® 10.Thanks to a new Microsoft Windows Hypervisor Platform (WHPX) API and recentopen-source contributions from Microsoft, even more Android app developers cantake advantage of all the speed improvements and features in the AndroidEmulator.Android Emulator running on Windows 10 with AMD Processor ScreenshotConfiguration: Asus ROG Strix GL 702ZC, Processor: AMD® Ryzen™ 7 1700Processor, Chipset: AMD 5350, Graphics: AMD® Radeon™ RX580Support for these technologies was initially available in the v27.3.8 AndroidEmulator canary release and today we are releasing this set of previewfeatures (AMD processor & Hyper-V support) on the stable channel for morefeedback. Alongside this update, we have added additional speed improvementsin loading emulator snapshots for those developers using the Intel® HardwareAccelerated Execution Manager (HAXM).

How do Android apps work on Windows 11?


As per Microsoft’s grand reveal on June 24th, Windows 11 is actually gettingAndroid app support, which would allow users to run their favorite Androidapps on their shiny, new Windows PC. Microsoft’s latest unveiling is clearlyfueled by Apple Silicon and native iOS app support on macOS systems. However,if you were hoping to have the same seamless Android experience on a Windows11 PC, you’re in for quite a revelation.Related: Can Your PC Run Windows 11?

Do Android apps run on Windows 10?


As we’ve seen in the section above, Windows 11 doesn’t actually supportAndroid applications as a Chromebook or an Android device does. It ticks offthe basics, of course, but there is a lot of work still left to be done. TheIntel Bridge Technology, which was developed in collaboration with Microsoftis the backbone of the system, which Windows 10 lacks. However, that doesn’tmean Windows 10 doesn’t support Android apps.

Third-party emulators


If you do not have a Samsung smartphone, the next best thing has to be athird-party Android emulator. BlueStacks is the leader of the pack, of course,but there are plenty of solid alternatives out there. Unfortunately, anemulator requires a lot of firepower to run swimmingly, which is not possiblefor every Android app enthusiast out there. Additionally, since an emulatorruns a separate instance of a full-fledged Android OS on your system, you willnot be able to pin apps or interact with them on the fly.So, if possible, try to steer clear off of emulators — they tend to demandquite a high price for some Android goodness.Related: Windows 11 Without TPM: How To Bypass the TPM Requirement and Installthe OS

Not all Windows 10 PCs would be able to run Android apps


After keeping the system requirement sheet unchanged from Windows 8.1 to 10,Microsoft decided to go all-out for Windows 11, demanding relatively newerchipsets of AMD and Intel — released after 2017. Additionally, all processorsneed to have two cores, at the very least, to function, which wasn’t the casewith Windows 8.1 or 10. The minimum RAM requirement, too, has been bumped upto 4GBs.When you combine the system requirements, it becomes pretty evident that notmany systems are capable of running Windows 11. And while Microsoft hasn’t yetcome up with a clarification for the same, we believe Microsoft focused onnewer processors and more RAM primarily because of native Android app support.The Bridge compiler converts non-x86 instructions to x86 instructions — aprocess that is tailor-made for newer processors. A Windows 10 PC with anolder processor — 2017 and earlier — may have run the remainder of Windows 11just fine, but Intel Bridge Technology wouldn’t have been supported. Andwithout Intel Bridge support and proper optimization, the systems would prettymuch be destined to fail.Related: How To Enable TPM 2.0 in BIOS for Windows 11 (and Enable Secure Boot)

Windows 10 still has 4 years left in its lifecycle


If we look at all the evidence, it becomes abundantly clear that Microsoft isnot too concerned with Android support on Windows 10 systems. However, thatdoesn’t necessarily mean they will not consider bringing it to Windows 10.As per Microsoft, Windows 10 will stay active and be officially supporteduntil October 14th, 2025, which is over four years away. Yes, the upcomingupdates over the next four years may not include a flagship feature — likesupport for native Android apps — but we can certainly hope for a favorableoutcome.

Android to Windows 10: Final words


After months of tinkering, Windows can now finally run Android apps natively.However, claiming that Windows 11 has native Android app support may not bethe most accurate depiction of the story. Yes, Windows 11 can run Androidapplications, but they aren’t directly powered by Google like Chromebook.Instead, Microsoft is using Amazon App Store as a mediator to bring theexperience to users.As a Windows 10 user, you are bound to feel tempted, to feel bad for missingout on this feature. But in reality, the partial Android app support onWindows 11 might not be that lucrative of a deal. Currently, Windows 10 offersus the perfect blend of tech and convenience, of features that can impress andare optimized. Windows 11, on the other hand, is yet to prove its mettle, andit would take a while for it to convince its doubters.Android apps may not come to Windows 10 in the near future, or ever, for thatmatter. But the lack of Android apps shouldn’t be the reason for any of us toabandon the great OS — the best Microsoft has built since Windows 7.RELATEDHow to Install Android on Your Windows TabletWindows tablets are becoming more popular. But if you’re looking for a biggerselection of apps, Android is the answer.While installing Android on a desktop PC is reasonably straightforward, youmight find installation tricky on a Windows tablet. One problem is thattablets don’t have a CD/DVD drive.So how can you install Android on a Windows tablet? We’ll show you.

Why Install Android on a Windows Tablet?


Windows has a usable UI in touchscreen and tablet mode, but the MicrosoftStore’s app selection is comparatively modest.If you already have experience with Android tablets and don’t particularlylike the Windows touch environment, switching is sensible (where possible,that is). Thanks to enhanced OTG support on Android (so you can connect USBdrives and input devices) you might not even notice a difference!Note, however, that you’ll be restricted to apps that support x86-compatiblesystems. These are growing in number, but don’t expect to run every app in thePlay store.

Configuring Your Windows Tablet for Android Installation


You can’t just install a second operating system on a device designed forWindows without making a few adjustments to the system setup.First, you’ll need to ensure Secure Boot is disabled. Open Settings > Updateand Recovery > Recovery and select Restart Now under Advanced Start-up. Fromhere, use your arrow keys to select Troubleshoot, then Advanced Options > UEFIFirmware Settings.Here, find Security in the left-hand menu and set a Supervisor password. Onceyou’ve added that, open Boot, find the Secure Boot option, and set it toDisabled.With that done, hold down Power to restart, then hold the Windows button aswell until the screen comes back on. This enables a quick shortcut back intothe BIOS screen, where you should ensure UEFI Mode is selected.Next, switch the tablet off, and connect the USB hub directly to the USB port.Do not use a docking station.With the keyboard and USB stick connected to the hub, boot up your tablet PC,pressing F12. In the boot menu, use the arrow keys to select the USB drive.When you need to make selections (such as enabling dual boot), use yourdevice’s volume keys.Different versions of the Android installer have slightly different steps. Inmost cases, the dual boot option should be selected. It’s often not worthremoving Windows entirely as the bootloader is required for Android to boot.If all goes according to plan, when you next boot up the tablet you should seea boot menu, where you can select between Android and Windows.

Running Android on a Windows Tablet


It can be a hard slog, but eventually you should be able to install Android onyour Windows tablet. Perhaps you’ll end up with a dual-boot setup, or maybeyou’ll rely on a virtual machine instead. Either way, with Android running,you can start enjoying your favorite apps and games.With everything is installed, and Android booted up, it should work perfectly.However, whichever method you use to install Android on your Windows tablet,you’ll likely find some features missing or disabled.As such you’ll need to install Google Apps to get staples like YouTube, GooglePlay, Gmail, and all the other popular Google-provided Android apps.Image Credit: peshkova/DepositphotosWhatsApp Will Stop Working on Many Phones From November 1st: Is Your DeviceAffected?If you’re still using an iPhone 4S or an old Android phone, you’ll soon nolonger be able to access WhatsApp. Here’s what you need to know.Read NextAbout The AuthorChristian Cawley (1521 Articles Published)Deputy Editor for Security, Linux, DIY, Programming, and Tech Explained, andReally Useful Podcast producer, with extensive experience in desktop andsoftware support. A contributor to Linux Format magazine, Christian is aRaspberry Pi tinkerer, Lego lover and retro gaming fan.More From Christian Cawley

Windows Subsystem for Android (WSA)


As you’re probably, Windows comes with its own subsystem for Linux (WSL),which was introduced back in 2016. On Windows 11, WSL2 runs on its own kernel,device drivers, kernel modules, and users can even place their Linux fileswithin the root file system.With Windows 11, Microsoft is introducing two new features – GUI support forWSL and WSA (Windows Subsystem for Android).Using the WSL technology, Microsoft has now created Windows Subsystem forAndroid to run mobile apps on the desktop. WSA is similar to the existingWindows Subsystem for Linux (WSL) and it will provide support for “proxy”between the native app container and Android app.Microsoft is also integrating a virtual machine that would enablecompatibility for the Android Open Source Project (AOSP). Since WSA is basedon advancements from Project Astoria and WSL2, performance is expected to bebetter than the traditional emulators available in the market. This is one ofthe key upgrades for WSL2 over WSL1.To better support Android apps on Windows, Microsoft is working with Amazon tobring its Appstore to Windows 11. Amazon Appstore will be integrated intoMicrosoft Store for Android apps section and all users will have access to theAmazon marketplace, but there’s a catch – not every Android app in theAppstore will run on Windows 11.Microsoft officials confirmed Android apps will be enabled in future builds ofWindows 11 and the first preview build will not include Android Subsystem forWindows.At the moment, it’s unclear exactly how the APK sideloading process will workon Windows and whether Microsoft is working on a special installer for mobileapps.We have reached out to Microsoft for comment, and this story will be updatedif we hear anything more from the company.How to Connect Windows 10 and Android Using Microsoft’s ‘Your Phone’ AppAt its fall event, Microsoft not only launched new Surface computers, but alsoannounced the availability of the Windows 10 October 2018 Update. What was thetop new capability in that release? The Your Phone app, which allows for easysharing between a smartphone and your PC.Drag and drop photos from a phone via a window on the PC. Or send web pagesfrom a phone to the PC, where they can open immediately or reside in theAction Center for later use. You can also see your PC’s Timeline on the phone,though that feature is still labeled as beta—as is the coolest feature of all,Screen Mirroring, which displays and lets you interact with your smartphone’sscreen on a PC.If you have an Android phone, though, you can now get notifications from phoneapps in the Your Phone app on the PC, Microsoft announced this week.Microsoft would love to get the same functionality on iPhones, but Appleclosely guards its ecosystem. Android is a lot more customizable than iOS,even letting you drop in a different Launcher home screen for your phone. WithYour Phone, Microsoft takes advantage of this openness to deliver someimpressive linkage between the worlds of mobile and desktop.Read on to find out how to get going with the Your Phone app to transferphotos and send text messages on your PC. The Windows 10 update is rolling outgradually, but here’s how to get it now.

Running Android Apps on PC Without Emulator: Is it Even Possible?


The short answer is “Yes”, though this statement comes with a huge caveat.Just like we’ve spent years developing and optimizing BlueStacks to be thefastest and lightest Android app player in the market, Microsoft could, intheory, redevelop parts of Windows 11 to integrate Android apps directly inthe OS and run them natively without requiring any third-party services.However, “Possible” doesn’t mean that it’s “Optimal”, or even “Feasible”,depending on how you look at it.Emulators like BlueStacks exist to allow users to run Android apps on PC,without any extra effort on their end, nor any extra investment on thedeveloper’s side. These breakthroughs have come from our understanding ofvirtualization, which has led us to developing our exclusive app containertechnology. This essentially permits the emulation of Android apps on PC, justas if they were running on your phone, but with superior mouse and keyboardcontrols, as well as a plethora of tools and features to enhance the user’sexperience. And all the work associated with these possibilities is done onour end, at no expense to either the publishers or developers.Running apps natively on Windows 11, while an ambitious goal, implies thatdevelopers might need to adapt their code and optimize for this platform,leading to additional development costs and time for launching apps, which issomething that most developers will want to avoid unless absolutely necessary.To keep costs within budget, some teams choose to optimize and launch on asingle platform, which comes at the cost of not appealing to the entirety ofthe mobile gaming community.As a new entrant into the mobile app industry, Windows 11 will have lots ofchallenges when trying to breach into this market. They must try toincentivize developers to accommodate their apps to their operatingsystem—something that will make it worth the extra effort, time, and money.”

0 Comment

Leave a comment